International Association for Indigenous Aging

News and Events

 
 

 


From Kaiser Permanente
Dementia risk greatest for older Native-Americans and African-Americans with diabetes
Dec. 11, 2013


In the first study to look at racial and ethnic differences in dementia risk among older adults with type 2 diabetes, researchers found that dementia was much higher among Native Americans and African-Americans and lowest among Asian-Americans.


The study, published in Diabetes Care, included a group of more than 22,000 patients aged 60 or older who were members of the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Diabetes Registry. Dementia was diagnosed in 3,796 patients (17.1 percent of the study cohort) during a follow-up of up to 10 years. Dementia was not present in any of the patients at the start of the study.


Compared to Asian-Americans, Native Americans were 64 percent more likely to develop dementia, and African-Americans were 44 percent more likely. Almost 20 percent (or one in five) African-Americans and Native Americans were diagnosed with dementia during the 10-year study.


"We found that in a population of elderly individuals with type 2 diabetes, there were marked differences in rates of dementia over a 10-year period by racial and ethnic groups," said senior author Rachel Whitmer, PhD, research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research. "Moreover, the differences were not explained by diabetes-related complications, glycemic control or duration of diabetes. Nor were they altered by factors of age, gender, neighborhood deprivation index, body mass index, or hypertension."


Among people aged 60 and above, those with type 2 diabetes have double the risk of developing dementia. Certain racial and ethnic groups in the U.S., including Latinos, African-Americans, some Asian American groups, and Native Americans, are disproportionally affected by type 2 diabetes. However, the interplay of type 2 diabetes and race/ethnicity on long-term dementia risk has not been explored previously.


"Since ethnic minorities are the fastest-growing segment of the elderly population in the United States, it is critical to determine if they are at higher risk of dementia, especially among those with type 2 diabetes," said Elizabeth Rose Mayeda, PhD, lead author and postdoctoral fellow at University of California San Francisco. "It's eye-opening to see the magnitude of ethnic and racial differences in dementia risk in a study where everyone already has type 2 diabetes."


The researchers concluded that more work is needed to identify factors that will reduce dementia risk for those with diabetes, particularly for ethnic and minority groups at highest risk. While future research is greatly needed on potential dementia prevention efforts in general, these findings suggest that certain ethnic groups within the type 2 diabetes population may benefit the most.


This study is part of an ongoing body of work to better understand dementia. Earlier this year, Kaiser Permanente researchers created the first risk score that predicts the 10-year individualized dementia risk for patients with type 2 diabetes.


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IA2 Receives AoA Grant to Educate SMPs about AI/AN Outreach

Nov. 15, 2013

 

The International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) is pleased to announce the receipt of a SMP (Senior Medicare Patrol) Target Population Integration Grant from the Administration for Community Living/Administration on Aging (AoA). The IA2 project will focus on the American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Medicare population to develop outreach and educational materials to assist the SMPs in their efforts to ensure high quality and culturally competent service delivery to this hard-to-reach population.

 

Please see the entire press release at: http://www.iasquared.org/pressreleases.html

 

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IA2 Board Members Benson and Shenson Co-Author Article on 'Clinical and Community Delivery Systems for Preventive Care: An Integration Framework

Sept. 20, 2013

 

Bill Benson, President of the International Association for Indigenous Aging, and Board Member Doug Shenson, MD, MPH,  are among the co-authors of a paper on preventive care delivery, published in the October issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine (Volume 45, Issue 4, pp. 508-516). The article, “Clinical and Community Delivery Systems for Preventive Care: An Integration Framework,” examines the need to integrate clinical preventive services delivery across both clinical and community settings.

 

Please see the entire press release at: http://www.iasquared.org/pressreleases.html

 

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IA2 Board Member Joins Western Carolina University Gerontological Social Work Program

Aug. 30, 2013

 

IA2 board member R. Turner Goins, a nationally known specialist in American Indian aging issues, has been named first Ambassador Jeanette Hyde Distinguished Professor of Gerontological Social Work at Western Carolina University. Goins, formerly associate director of the Center for Healthy Aging Research and associate professor in the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University, joined the Western Carolina University faculty on Aug. 1, 2013.  

 

Please see the entire press release at: http://www.iasquared.org/pressreleases.html

 

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IA2 Speaks for Indian Elders at Invitation-Only Social Security Roundtable

July 29, 2013 

 

The International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) brought American Indian/ Alaska Native (AI/AN) concerns about the future of Social Security before the Social Security Acting Commissioner and other top Social Security Administration (SSA) officials today at an AI/AN Roundtable discussion sponsored by SSA. The meeting took place at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C.

 

Please see the entire press release at: http://www.iasquared.org/pressreleases.html

 

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Baldridge Named to New Mexico Child Fatality Review

July 1, 2013

 

IA2 Executive Director Dave Baldridge has been named as a member of the New Mexico Department of Health’s Child Fatality Review committee, known as The Broader Spectrum and Sudden Infant Death Review.

 

The New Mexico Child Fatality Review (NMCFR) was established in 1998 to examine the circumstances that contribute to the deaths of infants, children, and youth in New Mexico. The purpose of the NMCFR is to identify risk reduction, prevention, and systems improvement factors in these deaths and to recommend strategies that can prevent future injury and death. The NMCFR provides a forum to review agency actions and inactions as they relate to child protection and death reduction. The review process results in increased understanding of risk factors for deaths that help medical, public health and law enforcement personnel identify children at risk, and alert the community to emerging patterns of death.

 

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Indian Health Service Hospitals Designated as Baby-Friendly Facilities

July 18, 2013

 

Two Indian Health Service (IHS) hospitals— the Claremore Indian Hospital (CIH) in Oklahoma and the Phoenix Indian Medical Center (PIMC) in Arizona —have been certified as Baby-Friendly facilities by Baby-Friendly USA, Inc. This makes a total of five IHS facilities to have received this designation.

 

These designations were sought as part of the IHS Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. This initiative is part of First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move! in Indian Country” campaign dedicated to solving childhood obesity within a generation. The IHS campaign aims to certify all IHS obstetric facilities as Baby-Friendly by the end of 2014. This initiative promotes breastfeeding to reduce the risk that children will develop obesity and diabetes in the future. Baby-Friendly hospitals offer new mothers the information, confidence, and skills they need to initiate and continue breastfeeding their babies.

 

Go to http://www.ihs.gov/newsroom/pressreleases/2013pressreleases/ihsbabyfriendly/

 

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New Mexico Indian Elders Lead Way in Social Security Debate

June 20, 2012

 

Lincoln, NE – The International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) – a non-profit educational organization – is pleased to report the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) today adopted a national resolution showing Indian Country’s support for Social Security.

 

Please see the entire press release at: http://www.iasquared.org/pressreleases.html

 

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New Video from CDC’s Native Diabetes Wellness Program

June 9, 2013

 

The Our Cultures Are Our Source of Health video highlights the wisdom of cultural knowledge in promoting health and preventing diseases such as type 2 diabetes in American Indian and Alaska Native communities.  This video features renowned Cherokee actor Wes Studi and was filmed at the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. 

 

Type 2 diabetes is a growing concern around the world. American Indian and Alaska Native adults are twice as likely to have diagnosed diabetes as non-Hispanic whites. In addition, Native American youth aged 10 to 19 years are developing type 2 diabetes at higher rates than youth in other racial and ethnic groups of this age. Tribal communities are engaging youth and families to reclaim traditional ways of health by harvesting local, traditional foods and increasing access to traditional games and dancing.

 

To view the video, go to http://www.cdc.gov/CDCTV/OurCultures/index.html

 

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Failure to deliver healthcare now presents greatest obstacle to global health, says World Bank Group President

May  20, 2013

 

In a new Health Policy paper published in The Lancet, World Bank Group President Dr Jim Yong Kim and co-authors argue that despite the great progress made in improving global health in the past two decades, failure to pay attention to “the gritty business of actually delivering health care in developing countries” is resulting in inefficient, ineffective and inequitable health care for many, and this failure to deliver healthcare effectively presents one of the biggest obstacles facing global health today.

 

The paper, co-authored with Professor Paul Farmer of Harvard Medical School and Professor Michael Porter of Harvard Business School, is published just ahead of Dr Kim’s keynote address to the 66th World Health Assembly, being held in Geneva 21 – 26 May 2013, with the speech being given on Tuesday 21 May.  In his speech he will discuss the importance of effective delivery in realizing universal health coverage and achieving the goals to end extreme poverty by 2030 and boost shared prosperity.

 

According to the authors, “The gritty business of actually delivering health care in developing countries has not attracted much academic interest, even though improving capacity to deliver care in these settings will save lives, leverage substantial and growing philanthropic support of global health, and increase returns on existing and new investments in both discovery and development of new resources…What scant attention to research and teaching of health-care delivery exists is focused on specific questions about particular interventions (eg, the feasibility of administration of a vaccine, and its cost-effectiveness) rather than on the broader systems and conditions.”

 

The authors propose an innovative new, value-based framework for understanding, improving, and integrating the set of activities involved in caring for any medical condition, as well as highlighting the need for shared delivery health infrastructure, whereby delivery of care is integrated and co-ordinated across different components, including hospitals, clinics, and laboratories.

 

“The current, fragmented approach is costing us dearly in terms of duplication, inefficiency, poor use of human resources, and high procurement costs. It is costing patients most of all: they are dying of preventable diseases and suffering without therapies readily available elsewhere. A strategic approach to global health delivery will help us to move from the fragmentation of services and providers registered in most developing (and many developed) countries towards integrated, effective delivery systems that provide value for patients.”

 

“We will not end extreme poverty without sustained investments in healthcare delivery. If delivery systems can be transformed around the principle of value, the promise of health and productivity for those now facing both poverty and disease will not be squandered,” say the authors.

 

For  more information, go to  http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(13)61047-8/abstract

 

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The UK will use its Presidency of the G8 to identify and agree a new international approach on dementia research

May 15, 2013

 

“The UK will use its Presidency of the G8 to identify and agree a new international approach on dementia research in recognition that the condition is fast becoming the biggest pressure on care systems around the world," United Kingdom Prime Minister David Cameron announced today.

 

Current estimates indicate 35.6 million people worldwide are living with dementia but with the world’s populations aging, the World Health Organization estimates that number will nearly double every 20 years, to an estimated 65.7 million in 2030, and 115.4 million in 2050.

 

For more, go to https://www.gov.uk/government/news/uk-to-use-g8-to-target-global-effort-on-dementia

 

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Older people in Africa have limited functional ability

May 7, 2013

 

Many adults 45 years and older in Africa have limited functional ability, according to the Public Library of Science (PLOS). The number of adults living into older age in sub-Saharan Africa is rapidly growing yet many older men and women will have an illness or disability that limits their ability to function, according to a study by researchers from the US and Malawi published in this week's PLOS Medicine.

 

 The researchers, led by Collin Payne from the University of Pennsylvania, also show that remaining life spent with severe limitations at age 45 in a sub Saharan African setting (Malawi) is comparable to that of 80-year-olds in the US. These findings are important as older people with functional limitations have difficulty performing the physical work required in rural agricultural settings and so investing in their health could also potentially boost economic growth.

 

To view the entire press release, go to http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2013-05/plos-opi050113.php

 

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IA2 Assists with First-Ever Training on Investigating Infant Deaths in Indian Country

More than 60 Navajo police, FBI, law enforcement officers attend

April 30, 2013

 

More than 60 Navajo and Pueblo police officers, FBI agents and other law enforcement officials have completed a two-day training conference to investigate infant deaths in Indian Country. The conference—the first of its kind for Indian Country—was produced by the National Center for the Review & Prevention of Child Deaths at the Michigan Public Health Institute (MPHI) in collaboration with the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2).

 

See our press release at http://www.iasquared.org/pressreleases.html

 

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National Diabetes Education Program News

new "American Indian/Alaska Native Fat and Calorie Counter"

Request a copy: aianpt@cdc.gov


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IOM Will Host Elder Abuse and its Prevention Workshop This Week

Aril 16, 2013

 

The Institute of Medicine will host a 2-day public workshop April 17-18 on global elder abuse and its prevention. Using an ecological framework, this workshop will explore the burden of elder abuse around the world, focusing on its impacts on individuals, families, communities, and societies. Additionally, the workshop will address occurrences and co-occurrences of different types of abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional, and financial, as well as neglect. The ultimate objective is to illuminate promising global and multisectoral evidence-based approaches to the prevention of elder maltreatment. 

 

Violence and related forms of abuse against elders is a global public health and human rights problem with far-reaching consequences, resulting in increased death, disability, and exploitation with collateral effects on well-being. Data suggest that at least 10 percent of elders in the United States are victims of elder maltreatment every year. In low- and middle-income countries, where the burden of violence is the greatest, the figure is likely even higher.
 

In addition, elders experiencing risk factors such as diminishing cognitive function, caregiver dependence, and social isolation are more vulnerable to maltreatment and underreporting. As the world population of adults aged 65 and older continues to grow, the implications of elder maltreatment for health care, social welfare, justice, and financial systems are great. However, despite the magnitude of global elder maltreatment, it has been an underappreciated public health problem.


Go to http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Global/ViolenceForum/2013-APR-17.aspx

 

 

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World Conference on Indigenous Peoples

April 12, 2013

 

The World Conference on Indigenous Peoples will be held on May 14, 2012 in the afternoon. It is the 11th session of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues.

 

In 2014, the United Nations General Assembly will convene a high-level plenary meeting, to be known as the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples.

 

The main objectives of the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples are to share perspectives and best practices on the realization of the rights of indigenous peoples and to pursue the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

 

Go to http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/2012/News%20and%20Media/EN%20Fact%20Sheet-World%20conference.PDF

 

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Long-Term Services and Supports Webinar Mentions IA2 Issue Brief on Empathy and End-of-Life Care

 March 27, 2013

 

IA2’s issue brief on “Moving Beyond Paradigm Paralysis:  American Indian End-of-Life Care” was discussed during a March 27 webinar in a series on Long-Term Services and Supports sponsored by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, Administration on Aging and Indian Health Service. The issue brief was prepared for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Healthy Aging Program.

 

The goal of the webinars is to share knowledge and promising practices in the field and build an ongoing dialogue among tribal, IHS, and Urban Indian health programs engaged in delivery of long-term services and supports for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people. The audience includes Title VI grantees, IHS, tribal, urban Indian health programs, community health representatives, and tribal program staff engaged in the delivery of long-term services and supports.

 

The March 27 webinar was titled “Oneida Nation Elder Services: Cultural Adaptations to a Chronic Disease Self-Management Program.” It is online at http://www.kauffmaninc.com/ltss/video/webinar_3-27-2013.html.

 

The IA2 paper can be viewed at http://www.healthbenefitsabcs.com/DocumentsPublic/file/News/EOL%20AI-AN%20%20CIB%20508%20compliant.pdf

 

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IA2 Testifies before IOM on End of Life Care in Indian Country

Feb. 20, 2013

 

Bill Benson, President of the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2), spoke today before the Institute of Medicine Committee on Transforming End-of-Life Care. His testimony focused on end-of-life care in Indian Country.

 

Benson reported on an IA2 report, which examined four American Indian end-of-life programs that are demonstrating extraordinary success, measured in part by rates of patient/family compliance with advance directives and patient satisfaction surveys.  Surprisingly, this effort revealed strong evidence that long-standing perceptions of cultural/racial barriers are not accurate.  Existing paradigms of culturally-appropriate EOL care may no longer apply.  In these four programs, provider empathy emerges as perhaps the foremost critical factor in the acceptability of end-of-life discussions.  

 

“Both researchers and public perception have long assumed that some minority populations are averse to talking about end-of-life issues; and that in particular, traditional Indian beliefs preclude these discussions.  Yet one IHS medical and social work team – working in Ft. Defiance, Ariz., over a period of ten years in the heart of the Navajo reservation, one of the most traditional of Indian tribes – produced a 90 percent success rate with durable medical powers of attorney and other advance directives – far above national rates of less than 30 percent.  As a result, the program director – a non-Native – was invited to become an honorary member of the Navajo Medicine Man’s Association – a previously unimaginable honor,” Benson stated.

 

At the University of New Mexico Hospitals, similar rates of measurable success are occurring in a patient population that is 40% Hispanic, 40% white, and 10% American Indian. UNMH sees the highest percentage of AI/AN patients among total admissions of any academic hospital in the country. In urban Albuquerque, Native patients may come from any of dozens of different tribes.  Following consultation with the EOL program, Native patients’ preference for putting a DNR order in place increased from 22 percent to 62 percent, and  family end-of-life meetings increased by an even greater rate, from 30 percent to 76 percent. Clearly, the program is having a significant effect.

 

'Empathy trumps culture'

 

As the UNM program director said to IA2, “Most of our patients come to us already in crisis, so we try to create an immediate Plan of Care,” which evolves from their issues, and those of their families.  She believes, “The secret is to come in with no preconceived assumptions, and to let the patients and their families take the lead.  Most of our patients are in such emotional pain that they appreciate ANYONE who will listen and who cares about them.  In short, empathy trumps culture.” We really like that point, “Empathy trumps culture.”

 

Similar results are occurring at the Zuni Pueblo in New Mexico and Cherokee Nation in Oklahoma.  Both are also featured in IA2's report.

 

For more details, see the Feb. 20 press release in our “Press Releases” section, http://www.iasquared.org/pressreleases.html

 

To view IA2's  report, prepared for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Healthy Aging Program, "Moving Beyond Paradigm Paralysis: American Indian End-of-Life Care," go to http://www.iasquared.org/products.html


 

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American Indian and Alaska Native Poverty Rate About 50 Percent in Rapid City, S.D., and About 30 Percent in Five Other Cities, Census Bureau Reports

Feb. 20, 2013

 

The poverty rate for American Indians and Alaska Natives in Rapid City, S.D. (50.9 percent) was around three times the rate in Anchorage, Alaska (16.6 percent) and about 30 percent or greater in five other cities most populated by this group (Gallup, N.M.; Minneapolis; Rapid City, S.D.; Shiprock, N.M.; Tucson, Ariz.; and Zuni Pueblo, N.M.), according to American Community Survey data collected from 2007 to 2011 by the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

Nine states had poverty rates of about 30 percent or more for American Indians and Alaska Natives (Arizona, Maine, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, South Dakota and Utah).

 

"With the American Community Survey, we can look at the poverty rates for even the smallest race and Hispanic-origin groups," said Suzanne Macartney, an analyst in the Census Bureau's Poverty Statistics Branch.

 

These figures come from Poverty Rates for Selected Detailed Race and Hispanic Groups by State and Place: 2007-2011, an American Community Survey brief that presents poverty rates by race and Hispanic origin for the United States, each state and the District of Columbia.

 

To view the entire press release, go to http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/american_community_survey_acs/cb13-29.html

 

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U.S. Health in International Perspective: Shorter Lives, Poorer Health

Jan. 9, 2013

 

The United States is among the wealthiest nations in the world, but it is far from the healthiest. For many years, Americans have been dying at younger ages than people in almost all other high-income countries.

 

To gain a better understanding of this problem, the National Institutes of Health asked the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine to investigate potential reasons for the U.S. health disadvantage and to assess its larger implications. No single factor can fully explain the U.S. health disadvantage. Without action to reverse current trends, the health of Americans will probably continue to fall behind that of people in other high-income countries.

 

To read the report, go to http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2013/US-Health-in-International-Perspective-Shorter-Lives-Poorer-Health.aspx

 

 
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IA2 Issue Brief Focuses on American Indian Diabetes and Depression, Prepared for CDC’s Healthy Aging Program

Jan. 2, 2013

 

The International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) announces that its fourth in a series of issue briefs on American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) topics impacting Indian elders has been posted today on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) website for the Healthy Aging Program. IA2 is a nonprofit organization dedicated to acting as a positive force to improve the status of older people worldwide, especially indigenous populations.

 

In wide-ranging interviews with IA2 Executive Director Dave Baldridge, experts discussed the “vicious cycle” of diabetes and depression, with one leading to the other. The rates of co-occurring diabetes and depression among AI/ANs are so high and the potential impact so profound that CDC and the Indian Health Service (IHS) are working to develop strategies that may well ultimately serve as models for health care providers throughout the nation for treating individuals with diabetes and depression.

 

The new issue brief on “Diabetes and Depression Among American Indian and Alaska Native Elders,” is online at www.cdc.gov/aging/pdf/hap-issue-brief-aian.pdf.

 

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2010 Census American Indian and Alaska Native Summary File

Dec. 13, 2012

This summary file provides detailed demographic information from the 2010 Census for more than 1,500 American Indian and Alaska Native tribal groupings, specific American Indian tribes and specific Alaska Native villages. These statistics are available for a variety of geographic areas. However, only geographic entities with a population of at least 100 for the specified group are available. The summary file has the largest number of American Indian and Alaska Native iteration groups of any Census Bureau data product released and adds a new layer of detail to the population and housing topics previously released from the census.

 

Go to http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/2010_census/cb12-241.html.

 

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Tribal Nations Send Message about “Fiscal Cliff” in Advance of White House Tribal Nations Summit

Dec 3, 2012

 
In advance of the 2012 White House Tribal Nations Summit this Wednesday, Native leaders are weighing in on the effect the fiscal cliff will have on the 566 federally recognized tribal nations and American Indian and Alaska Native citizens. A joint tribal letter sent last week to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives John Boehner, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, signed by the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) and 65 tribes and tribal organizations, outlines the risk of deep sequestration cuts to the already underfunded federal responsibilities to tribal nations.
 

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Australia: $4.5M To Help Prevent Suicide In Indigenous Communities - Call For Applications

Nov. 30, 2012

 

Up to $4.5 million in funding for projects to tackle the high rate of Indigenous suicide are now available for application until 21 December.

 

Minister for Mental Health Mark Butler said community-led projects targeting suicide prevention were an important part of addressing the issue.

 

Go to http://indigenouspeoplesissues.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=16842:australia-4-5m-to-help-prevent-suicide-in-indigenous-communities-call-for-applications&catid=49&Itemid=84


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From SteveGold ADA.com

Disabled and Elderly People in China.  Information Bulletin #365 (11/2012)

Nov. 26, 2012

Out of the 1.3 billion people, approximately 85 million are people with disabilities and 190 million are people aged 60 or older.  There are about 33 million elderly with various disabilities.

See Disabled and Elderly People in China, http://www.stevegoldada.com/stevegoldada/archive.php?mode=A&id=365;&sort=D

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from Native News

US Congressional Apology Needs Translations into Native Languages

Nov. 24, 2012

Fort Defiance, AZ -- When Navajo Mark Charles reads the apology to American Indians next month that was buried in a Congressional appropriations bill three years ago with the US Capitol Building in the background, he hopes the apology can be read in as many Native languages as possible. The event will take place at 11:00 am on December 19th.

Charles is quick to point out that this event is not in sponsorship with any organization or on behalf of any particular American Indian tribe. The Apology to American Indians is on page 45 of the 67 page-long 2010 Department of Defense Appropriations Act (HR 3326). This date marks the third anniversary of the passing of HR 3326, and the apology.

To view the entire article, go to http://www.nativenewsnetwork.com/us-congressional-apology-needs-translations-into-native-languages.html

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NIHB Update on the Status of the SDPI Renewal Campaign

Nov. 20, 2012

“As you know, Congress adjourned at the end of last week for the Thanksgiving break, and plans to return to Washington on Monday, November 29th. Despite aggressive efforts by NIHB, tribal leadership, the American Diabetes Association, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, and other partner organizations, Congress did not provide an extension for the SDPI before leaving for the Thanksgiving holiday break. The legislative vehicle that we have been targeting – a health extenders package – did not emerge from the Senate Finance Committee. The good news is that this is a priority for the Committee when it returns to Washington next week. The bad news is that there are many things Congress is trying to finish before the end of the year, and it is proving very difficult to find the money to pay for many programs including SDPI.”

To view the entire statement, go to http://www.mtwytlc.org/component/content/article/113-indian-organizations/394-update-on-sdpi-reauthorization.html

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U.S. Representative Introduced Special Diabetes Program Reauthorization Bill

Nov. 20, 2012

  

CherokeePhoenix.org reports that U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette, D-Colo., has introduced a bill to reauthorize the Special Diabetes Program, which has two programs – the Special Diabetes Program for Type 1 Diabetes and the Special Diabetes Program for Indians.

To view the entire item, go to http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Article/Index/6802

 

 

To view H.R. 6309, go to http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/D?d112:1:./temp/~bdf3qD::|/home/LegislativeData.php|

 

 

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IA2 Signs Contract to Bring Navajo Nation Law Enforcement to Child Death Review Conference
Nov. 9, 2012

 

Bill Benson, President of the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2), announces that IA2 has signed a contract with the National Center for the Review and Prevention of Child Deaths/Michigan Public Health Institute to create high voluntary attendance among Navajo Nation law enforcement personnel for a March 2013 law enforcement/death investigator training conference focused on sudden and unexpected infant deaths.

 

Dave Baldridge, Executive Director of IA2, will work with Navajo Nation law enforcement and other Navajo officials as part of the planning effort.

 

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National Native American Heritage Month, 2012: A Proclamation By The President Of The United States Of America
N
ov. 1, 2012

 

As the first people to live on the land we all cherish, American Indians and Alaska Natives have profoundly shaped our country's character and our cultural heritage. Today, Native Americans are leaders in every aspect of our society -- from the classroom, to the boardroom, to the battlefield. This month, we celebrate and honor the many ways American Indians and Alaska Natives have enriched our Nation, and we renew our commitment to respecting each tribe's identity while ensuring equal opportunity to pursue the American dream.

 

To view the entire proclamation, go to http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2012/11/01/presidential-proclamation-national-native-american-heritage-month-2012

 

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Statement from HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on National Native American Heritage Month
November 1, 2012

 

“Each November we celebrate National Native American Heritage Month – the history, culture, and character of American Indian and Alaska Native people.
This year’s theme, “Native Families Moving Ahead: Together We Strengthen Our Nations,” speaks to the importance of continuing on the path to a healthier future for all American families.”

 

To view entire statement, go to http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2012pres/11/20121101a.html

 

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American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month: November 2012
Oct. 25, 2012

 

This Facts for Features presents statistics for American Indians and Alaska Natives in honor of American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month (November).

 

To view Census document, go to http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/cb12-ff22.html

 

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Administration for Community Living Announces Adoption of the United Nation's Economic Commission on Europe Ministerial Declaration
Sept. 29, 2012

 

The Department of Health and Human Services' Administration for Community Living Assistant Secretary for Aging, Kathy Greenlee, who served as the Head of the U.S. Delegation, announced the adoption of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) Ministerial Declaration, “Ensuring A Society for all Ages: Promoting Quality of Life and Active Ageing.” This declaration was negotiated and agreed to by the assembly of member countries at the 2012 UNECE Ministerial Conference on Ageing held in Vienna, Austria, September 19-20, 2012.

 

For additional information on the conference and the final declaration agreed to by the member countries, visit http://www.unece.org/index.php?id=30925

 

For the Assistant Secretary's Ministerial Statement, visit http://www.aoa.gov/AoAroot/Press_Room/Breaking_Story/2012/MinisterialStatement.pdf

 

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American Diabetes Association Announces Fourth Annual John Pipe Voices for Change Award Winners
Sept. 26, 2012

 

Several leading Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) grantees will be presented with the American Diabetes Association's John Pipe Voices for Change Award.

 

Go to http://www.diabetes.org/for-media/2012/american-diabetes-association-2012-voices-for-change-awards.html

 

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World Alzheimer Report Reveals Negative Perceptions about People with Dementia
Sept. 20, 2012

 

Seventy-five percent of people with dementia and 64 percent of caregivers believe there are negative associations for those diagnosed with dementia in their countries, according to survey fielded by Alzheimer’s Disease International and published today in the World Alzheimer Report 2012: Overcoming the Stigma of Dementia.

 

To view the press release, go to http://www.alz.org/documents_custom/war_press_release_final.pdf View report: http://www.alz.org/documents_custom/world_report_2012_final.pdf

 

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Nov. 14 IOM Workshop To Focus on Native Health Inequalities
Sept. 1, 2012

 

The Institute of Medicine’s Roundtable on the Promotion of Health Equity and the Elimination of Health Disparities will hold a workshop on Wednesday, November 14, in Seattle, WA. The purpose of this workshop, titled “Leveraging Culture to Address Health Inequalities: Examples from Native Communities,” is to focus on Native American Health and how culture is a decisive factor when addressing health inequalities.

 

The topics for the workshop include: 1) Training in cultural competence, 2) Weaving culture into the clinical setting, 3) Action in cancer prevention in Communities and 4) Action in diabetes prevention in Communities.

 

Go to http://www.iom.edu/Activities/SelectPops/HealthDisparities/2012-NOV-14.aspx

 

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Special Diabetes Program for Indians: Fighting Diabetes in Urban American Indian/Alaska Native Communities Fact Sheet

 

The Urban Indian Health Institute recently developed a fact sheet describing the impact of the Special Diabetes for Indians (SDPI) on Urban Indian Health Organizations and sharing findings from 10 years of Diabetes Audit data across the UIHOs. Since the inception of the SDPI, urban American Indians/Alaska Natives have experienced marked improvements in important diabetes outcomes like blood sugar control and cholesterol levels. SDPI is needed for urban American Indian/Alaska Native communities to continue to make clinical improvements and increase access to quality and culturally appropriate diabetes cares.

 

Find the SDPI Fact Sheet online here: http://bit.ly/OCJLq9, or go to http://nnlm.gov/bhic/2012/09/18/diabetes-native-communities-fact-sheet/

 

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NCAI Budget Request Seeks to Expand Older Americans Act and IHS Services
Aug. 19, 2012

 

The National Congress of American Indians has issued its annual budget request to Congress. It proposes a $367.6 million increase to the Indian Health Service to maintain current services and a $634 million increase for program services. This would help address funding disparities between the IHS and other federal health programs while still providing current services. Nearly one-half of that increase is necessary simply to maintain current services, a top priority for tribes.

 

For the Older Americans Act, NCIA says: "In tribal communities, elders are considered the “wisdom-keepers” and are held in the highest regard. However, it is these same elders in Indian Country that comprise the most economically disadvantaged elderly minority in the nation. Funds for grants to tribes have a history of being both well-managed but woefully inadequate to meet existing needs."

 

NCAI says Congress should:

 

  • Provide $30 million for Parts A (Grants for Native Americans) and B (Grants for Native Hawaiians) of the Older Americans Act.
  • Provide $8.3 million for the Native American Caregiver Support Program, and create a line-item for training for tribal recipients.
  • Create a tribal set-aside of $2 million under Subtitle B of Title VII of the Older Americans Act.
  • Provide $3 million for national minority aging organizations to build the capacity of community-based organizations to better serve American Indian and Alaska Native seniors under the Older Americans Act.

 

Go to http://www.ncai.org/resources/ncai-publications/indian-country-budget-request

 

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Baldridge Op-Ed Addresses Indian Diabetes
Aug. 15, 2012

 

IA2 Executive Director Dave Baldridge has an op-ed on “Combating diabetes in the American Indian community.”

He reports on some good outcomes with The Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI). Some of the health outcomes — including reductions in blood sugar and LDL or bad cholesterol — are approaching or have exceeded national Healthy People 2020 goals.

 

The op-ed is posted online at http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/opinion/combating-diabetes-in-the-american-indian-community/14488/.

 

For more on SDPI, go to http://www.ihs.gov/MedicalPrograms/Diabetes/index.cfm?module=programsSDPI

 

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Paper Examines Nursing Home Care Assumptions about AI/ANs
Aug. 8, 2012

 

IA2 Executive Director Dave Baldridge, along with senior author Mario Garrett and with Erin Williams, has published a new paper, “American Indians and Alaska Natives in Nursing Homes: Initial results from the 2008 Minimum Data Set,” in the current issue of the Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health (Vol. 10, No. 1).

 

The study questions the assumption that American Indian and Alaska Natives (AIANs) provide care for their frail older adults within the community. Using the Minimum Data Set (MDS) this study examined the status of Native elders in nursing homes compared to the white residents. The initial results indicate that AIANs enter the nursing homes at earlier stages of need and are more likely to be independent than white patients. In addition, AIANs were more likely to have lived alone or in another nursing home or residential facility prior to their present nursing home.

 

This study is a wakeup call to examine the continuum of care for American Indian and Alaska Native elders. With the migration of young people out of Native communities, and with a lack of social services infrastructure, Native elders are being placed in nursing homes much earlier than necessary and earlier than whites.

 

To view the paper, go to http://www.pimatisiwin.com/online/?page_id=1002

 

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Flu Vaccine Print Materials: American Indian & Alaska Natives
July 27, 2012

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has released a series of publications presenting vaccination information for American Indian/Alaska native populations.

 

Brochure: Protect the Circle of Life: Your Flu Vaccine Protects Me; My Flu Vaccine Protects You, http://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/native/protect_circle_life_brochure.pdf

 

Fact Sheet: Protect the Circle of Life, http://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/native/protect_circle_life_factsheet.pdf

 

Flyer: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/native/protect_circle_life_poster_8.5x11.pdf

 

Poster: http://www.cdc.gov/flu/pdf/freeresources/native/protect_circle_life_poster_18x24.pdf

 

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Census Bureau Older Populations to Exceed Children in Most World Regions by 2050, Census Bureau Reports
June 27, 2012

 

The world's inhabitants in 2012 are an older mix of people than was the case a decade ago, driven by declining fertility and increasing life expectancy. According to new U.S. Census Bureau population projections, by midcentury most world regions will resemble Europe, which in 2005 became the first major world region where the population 65 and older outnumbered those younger than 15.

 

Northern America, which includes Canada and the United States, will have joined Europe in this historic reversal of age group sizes by 2050, as will Asia, Latin America and Oceania (which includes Australia and New Zealand). Moreover, China is projected to move from having nearly twice as many people in the younger age group than in the older one in 2012, to the opposite situation by midcentury.

These projections come from an update of the Census Bureau's International Data Base, which includes estimates by age and sex to 100 years and older for countries and other areas with populations of 5,000 or more and provides information on population size and growth, mortality, fertility and net migration. Since April 2012, users of the International Data Base have been able to obtain population in single years of age, allowing them to calculate country-specific populations in particular age groups (e.g., population at selected ages younger than 5, or adolescents).

 

View release: http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/international_population/cb12-118.html

View data: http://www.census.gov/population/international/data/idb/informationGateway.php

 

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Dave Baldridge, Executive Director of the International Association for Indigenous Aging
June 25 2012

 

As the executive director of the International Association for Indigenous Aging, Dave Baldridge works to improve the status of older people worldwide, especially indigenous populations. He is a member of Cherokee Nation.

 

Read this interview with Dave Baldridge on Global Policy TV: http://globalpolicy.tv/topics/economy/social-insurance/item/296-dave-baldridge-executive-director-of-the-international-association-for-indigenous-aging

 

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American Indians and Social Security
June 22, 2012

 

At Boston's original tea party in 1773, American patriots -- symbolically dressed as Mohawk Indians -- dumped three shiploads of His Majesty's chamomile into Boston Harbor. They couldn't have known that more than two centuries later, another tea party would try to dump Social Security into Boston Harbor as well.

 

To view rest of this article by Dave Baldridge published in the June 22 Huffington Post, go to http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dave-baldridge/american-indians-social-security_b_1620386.html

 

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New Mexico Indian Elders Lead Way in Social Security Debate
June 20, 2012

 

Lincoln, NE – The International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) – a non-profit educational organization – is pleased to report the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) today adopted a national resolution showing Indian Country’s support for Social Security.

NCAI is comprised of elected leaders representing most of the nation’s 565 federally recognized tribes.

 

The resolution was developed through a grassroots initiative under a grant award by the National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) for an IA2 project entitled, “Leverage Model for Indian Elder Advocacy: Giving Elders a Voice on the National Stage.” The “Leverage Model” was designed to inform the national policymaking process by bringing the voices of elders at the grassroots level to the national stage. The approach minimizes the need for individual advocacy – a culturally uncomfortable process for American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) elders, IA2 Executive Director Dave Baldridge said. The elders’ voices, offered in a series of small community meetings last year, became a resolution.

 

Baldridge explained that IA2, working with partners from the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare and the New Mexico Office of Indian ElderAffairs, leveraged individual voices by conducting community dialogue sessions with elders at 16 Pueblo meal sites in New Mexico.

 

The resolution was unanimously endorsed – first by the elders’ small non-profit organization, the New Mexico Indian Council on Aging, and then by their tribal leaders. These elected tribal chairmen act together as voting members of the All Indian Pueblo Council (AIPC). Representing 19 Pueblos (tribes), their unified voice is a powerful one in national tribal politics. The Governors enthusiastically endorsed their elders’ statement, and presented the resolution in Lincoln, Nebraska, this week to hundreds of other tribal leaders at the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) mid-year conference.

 

As in New Mexico, the resolution’s approval ratio was 100 percent. It did not receive a single negative vote, passing through two committees and the general membership at the Lincoln conference.

 

This – a national statement from Indian Country and an unsurpassed exercise in grassroots democracy – may be news to many, but probably not to Indian Country, where listening to elders still ranks as a high priority.

 

American Indian elders, 350 of them, have made a national statement about Social Security. They don’t want to see their benefits or the Cost of Living Allowance (COLA) cut. They don’t want to see rich people pay less while they, on the bottom rung of America’s economic ladder, pay more. They don’t trust the political rhetoric they’re hearing about it. They are members of New Mexico’s 19 Indian Pueblos, and they tend to speak quietly. Their opinions sometimes get lost in the daily pressure cooker of Indian Country issues. That all changed today, as the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) adopted a national resolution in support of the New Mexico elders’ views. The voices of 350 Indian elders have become the unified voice of 3.5 million Indians and 565 tribes. Message: “Keep your hands off of our Social Security.”

 

The NCAI resolution urges Congress:

 

  • To not reduce Social Security’s Cost of Living Allowance and to increase the allowance in proportion to realistic rates of inflation experienced by low-income beneficiaries, such as rising health care costs; and
  • To not raise the age of full Social Security eligibility and consider returning it to 65, thus including more AIAN beneficiaries who have low-income, physically challenging careers; and
  • To protect low-income beneficiaries by utilizing broad sources of income to assure Social Security’s solvency; and
  • To mandate and fund the Social Security Administration to increase intergenerational outreach and educational opportunities to help underserved populations achieve greater economic security over their lifetimes.

 

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IA2 Reports NCAI Committee Passage of Elders’ Social Security Resolution
June 19, 2012

 

The National Congress of American Indians’ (NCAI) Human Resources Committee approved today by unanimous vote a resolution showing elders’ support for Social Security.

 

NCAI is comprised of elected leaders representing most of the nation’s 565 federally-recognized tribes. At its mid-year conference held June 17-20 in Lincoln, NE, NCAI delegates representing tribes, tribal organizations, and individual members attend committee and sub-committee meetings to discuss and process formal resolutions. The organization then adopts, rejects, or modifies these resolutions.

The resolution was developed through a grassroots initiative demonstrated by IA2 under a grant award from the National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) for an IA2 project entitled, “Leverage Model for Indian Elder Advocacy: Giving Elders a Voice on the National Stage.” The “Leverage Model” was designed to inform the national policymaking process by bringing the voices of elders at the grassroots level to the national stage.

 

The draft NCAI resolution makes the following Social Security policy recommendations:

 

  • Congress should not reduce Social Security’s Cost of Living Allowance and should increase the allowance in proportion to realistic rates of inflation.
  • Congress should keep the Social Security eligibility age at 65 years old.
  • Congress should utilize broader sources to income to ensure Social Security’s solvency.
  • Congress should mandate and fund the Social Security Administration to increase intergenerational outreach and educational opportunities.

 

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IA2 Reports NCAI Subcommittee Passage of Elders’ Social Security Resolution, under NASI Grant
June 18, 2012

 

The National Congress of American Indians’ (NCAI) Human Resources Committee’s Elders Subcommittee today approved a resolution showing elders’ support for Social Security. The resolution was then forwarded to the NCAI Human Resources full committee for a vote tomorrow.

 

NCAI is comprised of elected leaders representing most of the nation’s 565 federally-recognized tribes. At its mid-year conference held June 17-20, delegates representing tribes, tribal organizations, and individual members attend Committee and sub-committee meetings to discuss and process formal resolutions. The organization adopts, rejects, or modifies these resolutions.

The resolution was developed through a grassroots initiative demonstrated by IA2 under a grant award from the National Academy of Social Insurance (NASI) for an IA2 project entitled, “Leverage Model for Indian Elder Advocacy: Giving Elders a Voice on the National Stage.” The “Leverage Model” was designed to inform the national policymaking process by bringing the voices of elders at the grassroots level to the national stage.

 

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World Conference on Indigenous Peoples

In 2014, the United Nations General Assembly will convene a high-level plenary meeting, to be known as the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples. The main objectives of the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples are to share perspectives and best practices on the realization of the rights of indigenous peoples and to pursue the objectives of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

 

As the first such event, the World Conference presents a unique opportunity to draw attention to the situation of indigenous peoples, and the historical and current challenges they face.

 

For more, go to http://www.un.org/esa/socdev/unpfii/documents/2012/News%20and%20Media/EN%20Fact%20Sheet-World%20conference.PDF

 

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Health and Well-Being of Older Populations in Six Low- to Middle-Income Countries Examined in Census Bureau Report
May 7, 2012

 

Health levels varied greatly among people 50 and older in China, Ghana, India, Mexico, Russia and South Africa, but hypertension and arthritis were the two most common chronic conditions in all six countries, according to the first-ever

U.S. Census Bureau report to use data from the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE).

 

Commissioned by the National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health, the report, Shades of Gray: A Cross-Country Study of Health and Well-Being of the Older Populations in SAGE Countries, 2007-2010, examines the health status and access to health care among older populations in the aforementioned six low- to middle-income countries, which are each among the world's 50 most populous.

“Relatively few countries have age-specific health and disability data, and those that do are primarily high-income countries,” notes Census Bureau demographer Wan He, one of the report's co-authors, along with Mark Muenchrath of the Census Bureau and Paul Kowal of the World Health Organization (WHO). “SAGE provides much needed cross-country comparable health data that will shed light on our understanding of similarities and differences in the health of older adults across low-, middle- and high-income countries.”

 

To view release, go to http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb12-81.html

To view report, go to http://www.census.gov/prod/2012pubs/p95-12-01.pdf

 

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Forum on Indigenous Issues: Nutrition and Disease Prevention
May 7, 2012

 

The 11th session of the U.N. Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues will be held in New York from May 7-18. The special theme is "The Doctrine of Discovery: its enduring impact on indigenous peoples and the right to redress for past conquests (articles 28 and 37 of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples).”

 

A side event during the 11th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues will be Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) among Indigenous Peoples: Contribution of Indigenous Peoples to the provision of Nutritious Food for All.

Noncommunicable diseases - or NCDs - like heart attacks and strokes, cancers, diabetes and chronic respiratory disease account for over 63% of deaths in the world.

 

The event will be held Friday, May 11, 2012 to draw attention to integrating the needs of indigenous peoples into comprehensive plans for improving diets for the prevention and control of NCDs.

 

A panel of experts, practitioners and representatives of indigenous peoples will,

  • Review the trends in and links between indigenous foods, healthy diets, nutrition and NCDs among indigenous peoples; including identification of gaps in data and in areas for further research
  • Review sustainable approaches to agriculture and indigenous food production for healthier diets among indigenous peoples and the wider community, taking into account indigenous agricultural knowledge and practices
  • Share a best practice of preserving traditional food system within a sustainable national agriculture program.
  • Share an example of creative actions undertaken by indigenous peoples to support healthier diets, including for the prevention of NCDs
  • Frame NCDs in the international development processes as an opportunity for increased attention to the health issues of indigenous peoples

 

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Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Visits D.C. on Friday May 4
May 3, 2012

 

As part of his special visit to the United States, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Professor James Anaya, will hold a press conference on Friday 4 May at 1 p.m. Mr. Anaya will hold the press conference in Washington, D.C., at the United Nations Information Centre (1775 K Street NW #400).

 

The aim of the Special Rapporteur's visit to the United States is to examine the human rights situation of the indigenous peoples of the country, that is, American Indians/Native Americans, Alaska Natives and Native Hawaiians. During the visit, the Special Rapporteur held meetings and consultations with federal and state government officials, as well as with indigenous nations and their representatives, in various locations.

 

The Special Rapporteur will present the visit’s findings in a forthcoming session of the Human Rights Council.

For more, go to http://unsr.jamesanaya.org/visit-to-usa/official-visit-to-the-united-states-from-23-april-to-4-may-2012
and
http://unsr.jamesanaya.org/visit-to-usa/first-mission-to-the-usa-by-the-un-special-rapporteur-on-indigenous-peoples

 

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Mario Garrett Publishes Book on “New Insights in Aging”
May 2, 2012

 

Professor Mario D. Garrett, PhD, has completed a book on “New Insights in Aging.” The book provides an up-to-date evaluation of the science of aging. It condenses academic and clinical data into short--five hundred words--popular articles that explain the latest research on aging. It provides a summary of research and provides resources for speeches and editorials.

 

After joining the faculty at San Diego State University in 2004, Garrett was appointed director of the International Institute for Health and Human Service Development (2004-05), and was selected as the director for the Center for Injury Prevention and Research, and the Center on Aging (current). Garrett has over 20 years’ experience in large data management, manipulation, and analyses.

He is currently working on an International Association for Indigenous Aging contract with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors for “Geographic Distribution of American Indian and Alaska Natives in Nursing Homes.” (See item below)

 

Since 1995 Garrett has been working exclusively with national American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. He has compiled comprehensive databases on the health of AI/AN populations in the U.S.

 

Garrett established and maintained a Monograph series on Indian health for the National Indian Council on Aging with eight series published.

 

Previously, as the team leader of a United Nations Population Fund, and as the Program Manager/ Director of Programs with the United Nations International Institute on Aging, he coordinated a five-year project looking at support for the elderly in the People's Republic of China. While with the United Nations, Garrett founded the international aging magazine 'BOLD'.

 

Go more information on the book, go to https://www.createspace.com/3784458

 

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Statement by HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius on Asian-American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month
May 1, 2012

 

As we commemorate Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month, we celebrate the significant medical and scientific contributions made by this diverse community. During this month, we also recognize that many Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders still encounter barriers to accessing health care due to poverty, insurance status, and lack of culturally appropriate health services.

 

Through the new health care law, the Affordable Care Act, an additional 2.5 million young adults, including 97,000 Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders, have gained health coverage because they can stay on their parents' insurance plans until age 26. Also, an estimated 2.7 million Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders with private insurance now have access to expanded preventive services with no cost-sharing.

 

In addition, the new HHS data collection standards under this law expand the “Asian” and “Native Hawaiian or Other

Pacific Islander” categories to include Asian Indian, Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese, and “other Asian,” as well as Native Hawaiian, Guamanian or Chamorro, Samoan, and “other Pacific Islander,” to better help us understand the diversity of the populations we serve.

 

Go to http://www.hhs.gov/news/press/2012pres/05/20120501f.html

 

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IA2 Receives Contract to Map American Indian Populations in Nursing Homes
April 23, 2012

 

The International Association for Indigenous Aging has signed a contract with the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors for “Geographic Distribution of American Indian and Alaska Natives in Nursing Homes.”

 

Using the Minimum Data Set, this project will portray through the application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), maps of where American Indians and Alaska Native nursing home residents reside. The maps will show where the American Indian Reservations are and their proximity to specific nursing homes across the United States (including Alaska and Hawaii.) A GIS analysis will include the testing of whether the location of the nursing home in terms of distance from the reservation correlates with the status of AI/AN nursing home residents.

 

IA2 also recently signed a subcontract with the Oklahoma University Health Sciences Center to work on the

“Oklahoma Center on American Indian Diabetes Health Disparities” project. The project will evaluate the effectiveness of the Eagle Books series on diabetes developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

The Eagle Books are a series of four children’s books for Native American children and others interested in healthy living. The books promote type 2 diabetes prevention and encourage a return to traditional ways, including physical activity and healthy eating. The series was developed by CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation in collaboration with the Tribal Leaders Diabetes Committee and the Indian Health Service, in response to the burden of diabetes among Native Americans and the lack of diabetes prevention materials for children. (http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/eagle_exhibition.htm)

 

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World Elder Abuse Awareness Day June 15

The United Nations will observe World Elder Abuse Awareness Day every June 15. For this World Day, the National Center on Elder Abuse, the University of California-Irvine is asking people from all over the country to email brief video clips which it will use to create a video public awareness message about elder abuse.

 

Go to http://centeronelderabuse.org/elder_abuse_video_campaign.asp and follow the simple directions.

 

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Combating Elder Abuse in Indian Country
April 21, 2012

 

This article by New American Media looks at the problem of elder abuse in Indian Country and offers several suggestions to tribal leaders to prevent and treat elder abuse in Indian Country.

 

Among Native Americans, the number of American Indian and Alaska Native elders will more than double by 2030, with trends indicating those 65 or older will total 15 percent in 2030, up from 7 percent in 2010.

 

What these figures mean for Indian country is not yet known, the article states. Based on statistics for other crimes, it says it can reasonably be assumed that incidents of elder abuse are more common in tribal communities than the general population, but past efforts to identify the extent of the problem in Indian country have been inconclusive.

 

In 2004, the National Indian Council on Aging released its report titled “Preventing and Responding to Abuse of Elders in Indian Country.” The report lamented the lack of research, effective tribal codes and funding to address the problem.

 

In 2005, the Administration on Aging released its report, “Elder Abuse Issues in Indian Country.” This report also recognized the lack of research and funding for combating elder abuse. “Unfortunately, despite the reports and their recommendations, little progress appears to have been made,” the articles states.

 

Go to http://newamericamedia.org/2012/04/combating-elder-abuse-in-indian-country.php

 

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New Report Calls on Nations to Recognize Dementia as a Public Health Crisis
April 11, 2012

 

A report released today by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Alzheimer's Disease International (ADI) calls for governments and policymakers to make dementia a global public health priority. This new report provides an authoritative overview of the impact of dementia worldwide. In addition to valuable best practices and practical case studies from around the world, it contains a comprehensive collection of data, including hard-to-get statistics from low- and middle-income countries, thereby dramatically underscoring that this is truly a global problem.

 

To prepare the report, titled "Dementia: A Public Health Priority," WHO and ADI commissioned reports from four working groups of experts led by researchers from Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London and The Institute of Neurological Sciences, India.

"WHO recognises the size and complexity of the dementia challenge and urges countries to view dementia as a critical public health priority," said Dr. Shekhar Saxena, Director, Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse, WHO. "Right now, only eight of 194 WHO member states have a national dementia plan in place, and a few more are in development. Our hope is that other countries will follow suit, using this report as a starting point for planning and implementation."

 

For more, go to: http://www.ncdalliance.org/news/world-health-organization-and-alzheimers-disease-international-say-dementia-must-be-global-heal

 

"Dementia: A Public Health Priority" is available for download at http://www.alz.co.uk/WHO-dementia-report

 

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World Health Day: NCD Alliance Says Dropping Key Targets on Non-Communicable Diseases Places Future Health of the World’s Aging Population at Risk
April 3, 2012

 

The theme of this year’s World Health Day is healthy aging. With data showing that the major causes of premature death and years lost to disability in people aged 60 years and over are non-communicable diseases (NCDs), the NCD Alliance says that dropping key targets on NCDs will put the health of the world’s aging population at risk.

 

The NCD Alliance (http://www.ncdalliance.org/) was founded by the International Diabetes Federation, the Union for International Cancer Control, the World Heart Federation and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease. The NCD Alliance is a network of more than 2,000 organizations leading the global civil society movement against premature death and preventable illness and disability from NCDs, including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, chronic respiratory disease, and diabetes. These conditions share common risk factors including tobacco use, physical inactivity and unhealthy diets, and harmful alcohol use. The NCD Alliance aims to ensure that NCDs become central to the long-term global development agenda.

 

Data released by the World Health Organization (WHO) shows that the major causes of premature death and years lost to disability in older people in both high-income countries (HIC) and low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) are NCDs such as heart disease, cancers, diabetes, stroke, dementia, visual disorders and chronic respiratory disease. Furthermore, NCDs are the leading cause of death in the world, causing 60% of all deaths. In HIC, up to 90% of deaths are caused by NCDs, while in most LMICs, NCDs are also the leading cause of death.

 

For more, go to http://www.ncdalliance.org/news/dropping-key-targets-ncds-places-future-health-world%E2%80%99s-ageing-population-risk

 

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IA2 Attends Senator’s Older Americans Act Briefing
March 28, 2012

 

Sue Ward represented the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) this week at a March 28 U.S. Senate event in support of the Older Americans Act. Ward is a member of the board of directors of IA2.

 

The event was convened by Senator Bernie Sanders (VT), Chairman of the HELP Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging. Also in attendance were Whitehouse (RI), Kohl (WI), Merkley (OR), Blumenthal (CT), Manchin (WV), Casey (PA), and Franken (MN).

 

For more information, go to http://www.sanders.senate.gov/newsroom/news/?id=d3e2f534-0731-48ee-abc9-538cf0e403ef

 

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Senate Support Grows for Older Americans Act
March 29, 2012

 

Chairman Bernie Sanders was joined today by 14 other senators in calling for reauthorization of the Older Americans Act, the landmark law that supports Meals on Wheels and other programs for older adults. Title VI of the Older Americans Act provides nutrition and supportive services to tribes.

 

Go to http://www.sanders.senate.gov/newsroom/news/?id=d3e2f534-0731-48ee-abc9-538cf0e403ef

 

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Baldridge Presents at 2012 AI/AN Long Term Services and Supports Conference
March 21, 2012

 

IA2 Executive Director Dave Baldridge spoke at a March 21 Hospice/Palliative Care workshop held as part of the 2012 AI/AN Long Term Services and Supports Conference in Denver, CO.

 

He described his recent research into palliative care programs at four Native EOL sites that are demonstrating that innovative approaches can succeed. These programs are located at:
1. Ft. Defiance, Ariz.—the “Cultural Care Team Model”
2. Cherokee Nation (Okla.)—the “Client Centered Home Health Model”
3. Zuni (N.M.) Pueblo—the “Tribal/Indian Health Service Partnership Model”
4. University of New Mexico—the “Urban Institutional Model”

 

This work was described in an issue brief prepared for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Healthy Aging program entitled, “Moving Beyond Paradigm Paralysis American Indian End-of-Life.” To view the paper, go to http://www.healthbenefitsabcs.com/DocumentsPublic/file/News/EOL%20AI-AN%20%20CIB%20508%20compliant.pdf

 

Baldridge is the former executive director of the National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA) from 1991-2003. Under his leadership, NICOA became the nation's foremost nonprofit advocate for older Indians and Alaska Natives. The organization tripled in size while significantly influencing legislation and Federal policies affecting AI/AN elders. Baldridge has been actively involved in public policy and research efforts on Federal, state, and local levels. His publications on a wide variety of Indian aging issues have been widely distributed and cited.

 

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World Health Day 2012: Population Aging and Urbanization Conference in Boston
March 7, 2012

 

Tufts University and the Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging are sponsoring “World Health Day 2012: Population Aging and Urbanization: A Meeting of Minds,” on April 11-12, Boston. Go to http://whd.hnrc.tufts.edu/index.html.

 

The conference is designed to offer forward-looking solutions to the challenges of global aging and to underscore the urgency of an aging global population which is increasingly more concentrated in the cities and mega-cities of developing and developed nations alike.

 

The event will include a symposium, panel discussion and declaration to establish a focal point for future research, and to present practical solutions to policy makers aimed at promoting healthy aging for the global population

 

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IAIA Executive Director Participates in Closing the Racial Wealth Gap Seminar Series
Feb. 21, 2012

 

Dave Baldridge, Executive Director of the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) has been accepted as a Thought Leader Fellow to participate in a series of seminars under the Closing the Racial Wealth Gap (CRWG) Initiative, sponsored by the Center for Community Economic Development.

 

CRWG Thought Leader Fellows will belong to a cohort of approximately 20 Experts of Color who will participate in a comprehensive writing training conducted by The OpEd Project. Fellows will also receive access to an exclusive monthly conference call with major media insiders, weekly editing support from top journalists, and a year of high-level mentoring.

 

The training program consists of three interactive seminar sessions. The CRWG Initiative will award a scholarship to all Thought Leader Fellows to cover the costs of the OpEd Project training program.

For more information on the CRWG initiative, go to http://www.insightcced.org/index.php?page=Closing-RWG

 

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IAIA Executive Director to Present on Indian End-of-Life Wishes at LTC Conference
Feb. 21, 2012

 

Dave Baldridge, Executive Director of the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2), will present his paper, “End-of-Life Care at Four Sites” at the Long Term Services and Supports Conference, to be held March 21-23, 2012 in Denver, CO.

His presentation is based on a series of site visits conducted for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Healthy Aging Program to examine successful programs providing end-of-life and palliative care in Indian Country.

 

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Webinar Looks at Impact of Social Security Reform on Communities of Color, including American Indians
February 6, 2012

 

IA2 Executive Director Dave Baldridge participated in a Social Security Reform webinar sponsored by the Insight Center for Community Economic Development on Jan. 31. Baldridge is also a member of the Commission to Modernize Social Security.

Although Social Security was originally created as one leg of a “three-legged stool” for retirement support, along with private pensions and personal savings, Baldridge said, Native Americans are left with “a one-legged stool.”

 

Baldridge presented the following facts about the American Indian/Alaskan Native population:

  • More than 23% of AI/ANs lived in poverty in 2009.
  • 20% of AI/AN elderly married couples and 49% of Ai/AN elderly unmarried persons rely on Social Security for 90% or more of their income.
  • 31.5 percent of AlAN Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) recipients depend on SSDI for 90% or more of their income, and another 16% depend on it for 75-89% of their income.

 

A video of the webinar, “Why Communities of Color Should Care: About Social Security Reform,” is online at http://insightcced.org/ssresources.html

 

Meanwhile, Paul Kleyman with new America Media produced an article, “Ethnic Experts Call for Strengthening -- Not Cutting -- Social Security,” based on the webinar. Go to:

http://news.newamericamedia.org/news/view_article.html?article_id=48d2cc907f9c84d0f2d80219874551b9

 

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IA2 Makes Presentation at Social Security Conference
Jan. 27, 2012

 

IA2executive director Dave Baldridge participated in a roundtable discussion on “Changing the Conversation: Messaging Social Security” as part of the National Academy of Social Insurance’s annual conference held in Washington, D.C.

He spoke about the findings from IA2’s ongoing project, funded by NASI, on IA2’s "Leverage Model for Indian Advocacy: Giving Elders a Voice on the National Stage.”

 

The project was designed to inform the national policymaking process by bringing the voices of elders at the grassroots level to the national stage. The approach minimizes the need for individual advocacy—a culturally uncomfortable process for American Indian/Alaska Native elders. Baldridge explained that IA2 is leveraging individual voices by conducting community dialogue sessions with elders at 16 Pueblo meal sites in New Mexico. The process documents elders’ comments and concerns expressed in small roup settings, and then combine those comments into a single resolution reflecting New Mexico Pueblo elder voices.

 

Having gained unanimous endorsements from the New Mexico Indian Council on Aging and the All Indian Pueblo Council (tribal leaders of 19 Pueblos), the resolution will be presented in 2012 to the National Congress of American Indians, comprised of tribal leaders from throughout the nation.

 

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June 15 Is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day
June 15, 2011

 

Today is the sixth annual World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. It is an international effort in support of the United Nation's International Plan of Action on Ageing, which acknowledges the significance of elder abuse as a public health and human rights issue.

 

To learn more, go to:
http://ncea.aoa.gov/NCEAroot/Main_Site/About/Initiatives/Join_Us_Campaign.aspx

 

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IA2 Receives NASI Grant to Improve Lives of Indian Elders through Social Security Education
March 15, 2011

 

The National Academy for Social Insurance (NASI) has awarded a grant to the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) for a project titled "Leverage Model for Indian Elder Advocacy: Giving Elders a Voice on the National Stage."

 

Project tasks include:

* Creating culturally sensitive, low literacy educational tools about Social Security appropriate for an Indian elder audience;

* Providing Social Security benefits education to Indian elders at 14 sites in New Mexico;
obtaining grassroots input from New Mexico Indian elders in familiar settings using receptive dialogue and listening sessions;

* Developing a report that includes formal resolutions reflecting the spirit of the comments received;

* Obtaining endorsement of the report from various Indian stakeholder organizations; and

* Creating a "Leverage Model for Indian Elder Advocacy" for replication of the grassroots-to-national-level outreach and consensus-building effort among other tribes.

 

The completed Leverage Model will include an electronic kit of culturally sensitive materials, guidelines and processes for applying the Leverage Model for grassroots outreach and advocacy to Indian elders nationwide.

 

Formal partners working with IA2 include the State of New Mexico Office of Indian Elder Affairs and the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare's New Mexico State Representative.

 

Social Security programs can play a critical role in the economic stability of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs), who comprise 1% of the U.S. population. Yet this 2-million-member group exhibits -- both historically and currently -- some of the nation's lowest participation rates in Social Security programs and, in many cases, its members are unaware of the availability or importance of Social Security benefits. AI/AN elders rely on Social Security for the bulk of their retirement income, yet are among the most underserved recipient groups for Social Security retirement and disability benefits.

 

Contact: Dave Baldridge, Executive Director, IA2, 505-239-4793, dave@IAsquared.org.

 

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CDC Releases Issue Brief on American Indian End-of-Life Care
Feb. 20, 2011

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Healthy Aging Program and the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors have released a new Issue Brief prepared by staff of the International Association for Indigenous Aging (IA2) and Health Benefits ABCs.

The issue brief, Moving Beyond Paradigm Paralysis: American Indian End-of-Life Care, examines end-of-life beliefs of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) elders and concludes that health care and social services professionals may need to re-examine their assumptions about end-of-life care.

 

Conventional wisdom has long held that Indian elders -- especially those couched in traditional belief systems -- will not openly discuss issues related to death and dying. But, in light of changing culture and demographics and recent successes with new end-of-life care models for AI/AN populations, these long-held but increasingly unjustified assumptions may no longer apply.

 

The Issue Brief presents four case studies of successful programs providing end-of-life and palliative care in Indian Country:

* Ft. Defiance Home-Based Care Program
* Cherokee Nation Home Health Program
* Zuni Home Health Care Agency
* University of New Mexico Palliative Care Program

 

Their work shows that this need can be met in ways that appropriately address the wishes of the patient and family.

Click here to view the Issue Brief, or go to http://www.hbabcs.com/DocumentsPublic/file/News/EOL%20AI-AN%20%20CIB%201-20-2011.pdf

 

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Articles on Aging Population, Social Security, Worldwide
January 2011

 

Check out the Population Reference Bureaus article on "World Population Aging: Clocks Illustrate Growth in Population Under Age 5 and Over Age 65" by Carl Haub. Go to http://www.prb.org/Articles/2011/agingpopulationclocks.aspx

 

Also see: "Social Security and Retirement around the World: Historical Trends in Mortality and ealth, Employment, and Disability Insurance Participation and Reforms - Introduction and Summary," by Kevin S. Milligan and David A. Wise. Go to: http://www.nber.org/papers/w16719

 

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